The South Bay Groundwater Network and Hydrology

The Cal Poly Pomona 606 Graduate Studio researched the South Bay hydrology and stormwater network within their 2011 “Re-envisioning Open Space” report.  Some findings:

  • A system of injection wells injects over 17.5 million gallons per day of imported and recycled water to combat salt water intrusion into the aquifers beneath the South Bay.  Ironically, with the AES site located on top of the old Salt Lake, AES keeps three groundwater wells continuously pumping to prevent Units 5 and 6 from being submerged.
  • Less than half of the LA region’s stormwater is captured.  With imported water costs projected to increase substantially in the upcoming years, water conservation and new stormwater capture methods present significant opportunities.
    • Importing water is very energy intensive
    • Desalinization is very expensive
  • Most of the coastal neighborhood stormwater systems terminate in the Santa Monica Bay.
  • The water system, analyzed as a total system, presents opportunities for:
    • Open space
    • Better groundwater AND Santa Monica Bay water quality
    • Mitigation of future water costs.
The South Bay Salt Water Intrusion Barrier Wells

The Santa Monica Bay Depths, Currents and the South Bay Injection Wells Protecting Groundwater from the Cal Poly Pomona 606 Graduate Studio “Re-envisioning Open Space” report

 

Schematic Illustrating Salt Water Intrusion in Redondo Beach

Schematic Illustrating Salt Water Intrusion in Redondo Beach from the Cal Poly Pomona 606 Graduate Studio “Re-envisioning Open Space” report

 

South Bay Stormwater Network

South Bay Stormwater Network map from the Cal Poly Pomona 606 Graduate Studio “Re-envisioning Open Space” report. Note the system terminations into the Santa Monica Bay.

 

View a close up of the stormwater network in the King Harbor area.